HUMANTOLD IN THE NEWS

Press & Media

We believe in educating, advocating, and expanding the dialogue around mental health, therapy, and wellness, whenever and wherever we can. Check out our therapist contributions below.

  • Is Meditation the New Therapy?

    September 22, 2021 | Verywell Health

    Is Meditation the New Therapy?

    September 22, 2021 | Verywell Health

    The pandemic caused a rise in mental health issues, and simultaneously, increased the need for alternatives to in-person care. Humantold’s Javier Moreira talks about one of the leading options you can use to ease your mind: meditation. 

    In-person mental health care became widely inaccessible due to the pandemic—just as reports of anxiety, stress, and depression increased. Many people are taking to alternatives, like guided meditation videos and apps, to cope with the added strain. But will meditation continue growing in popularity? Will the trend stick around beyond the pandemic? 

    Javier Moreira (LMHC) illustrates the impacts meditation has on your well-being and how easy it is to incorporate into your daily self-care regimen. “Mindfulness and meditation apps, along with YouTube, have positive impacts by making meditation much more accessible to the average person,” he says. The best part is that there’s no added cost. All you need to practice guided meditation is an internet connection. 

    Get the full story on Verywell Health

  • Why Can’t I Make Friends?

    September 22, 2021 | Verywell Mind

    Why Can’t I Make Friends?

    September 22, 2021 | Verywell Mind

    Do you feel lonely or like you don’t have many friends? You’re not alone. In this Verywell Mind article, Humantold’s Jessica Ermilio provides insight on building meaningful relationships. 

    Making new friends as an adult can be tricky. There are many possible reasons you could be unsuccessful with friendship, all of which can negatively impact your mental health. But it’s possible to create new relationships at any age if you remain willing to put in the effort. 

    Jessica Ermilio (PsyD) expresses the importance of friendships for your mental health. “The need for safe and secure attachments begins at birth. As children, the parental figures in our lives typically satisfy that need by providing us with physical and emotional security. As we grow up, however, we look more towards close friendships or partnerships to satisfy these attachment needs,” she says. She recommends seeking comfortable environments or activities where you feel safe to meet people.

    Pick up Jessica’s other tips for making new friends on Verywell Mind.

  • Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Aromantic Sexuality

    September 15, 2021 | Hello Giggles

    Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Aromantic Sexuality

    September 15, 2021 | Hello Giggles

    What is aromantic sexuality? Humantold’s Kristjana McCarthy dives into the details about this little-discussed LGBTQIA+ identity and the raw power behind self-acceptance.

    Although it’s not widely known, the A in LGBTQIA+ includes many more identities than just asexuality. The letter also stands for aromantic, which is similar to asexuality, but not the same. Aromantic is the term for people who experience little to no romantic attraction. Like other sexualities and gender identities, aromantic people may fluctuate on the spectrum. But what’s important is owning who you are. 

    Kristjana McCarthy (LMHC) explains the importance of understanding and claiming your identity. "Finding an identity that describes your experience is a powerful moment for any LGBTQ identifying person," she says. "It can be a revolutionary experience of self-acceptance and love to find an identity and make it your own. Claiming an identity allows access to a community of like-minded individuals. This community attempts to create an environment of acceptance and belongingness, which are essential protective factors against the development of mental health conditions."

    Read more about what it means to be on the aromantic spectrum on Hello Giggles

  • Therapy: Approaching Mental Wellness With Various Art Forms

    September 7, 2021 | CELEB Magazine

    Therapy: Approaching Mental Wellness With Various Art Forms

    September 7, 2021 | CELEB Magazine

    To normalize talking about mental health, new forms of therapy are emerging for those unable to communicate their emotions using words. In this article, Humantold’s Christina Jeffrey discusses how art therapy works and who could benefit from it. 

    If you ever struggle to communicate your emotions with words alone, traditional therapy may be particularly challenging for you. But a new therapy type called art therapy could help bridge the gap. 

    Christina Jeffrey (LMHC) explains, “We respond to art emotionally, viscerally, and spiritually; we don’t always allow ourselves that freedom when in direct conversation or even in [a] traditional therapy setting.” When deciding the creative outlet that’s right for you, she says, “it will most often depend on the client’s age and their interests. Some clients are more drawn to music as a form of expression, while others may gravitate more towards the visual arts like painting or photography, and others prefer writing, sculpture, or even cooking and baking.”

    Find out if art therapy may be right for you on CELEB Magazine

Humantold… offers a network of psychotherapist services for those seeking affordable ways to improve their mental health and overall well-being.

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